Social Benefit

100 Scholarships Awarded To Homeschool Children

June 6, 2017

PRESS RELEASE

Denver, Colorado. For Immediate Release.

Elephant Learning has announced today that they have awarded 100 scholarships of Elephant Learning’s Automated Math Academy to the Homeschool Foundation, the charitable arm of Home School Legal Defense Association of Purcellville, Virginia.  The scholarships are aimed at ensuring that homeschooled youth, and their parents, have access to the same tools that private & charter schools obtain.  Each scholarship enrolls students for 1 full year within the academy without tuition.

Elephant Learning is an Automated Math Academy that can be accessed via desktop, mobile, or tablet.  The system advances math skills by one grade level in three months.  The secret is focusing on understanding concepts and advanced technology.

The academy is an initiative in the University of Denver’s social enterprise initiative and is a partnership between alumni, professors, and the University to bring advanced learning techniques to the public.

"We did a report of all the children in our system that have played for over 5 weeks but less than 10 weeks," says Dr. Aditya Nagrath PhD, CEO of Elephant Learning and PhD Mathematics and Computer Science 2008, "the result was that on average the children were 1.5 years ahead of where they started after only 10 weeks in the system with an average playtime of 29 minutes.""One child in the system played 60 minutes per a week and gained 4 years of math skills.  The child is a five year old boy who is homeschooled preschool and is now multiplying and dividing with questions that are difficult for most 9 year olds." said Dr. Alvaro Arias, Professor of Mathematics and Co-Founder of Elephant Learning. "Math played at the right level is challenging and fun.  When it is too hard, children become frustrated and when it is too easy they become bored.""Our technology is able to quickly detect gaps in understanding and we fill those gaps with proven activities written by experts in early education." added Dr. Nagrath.  "The results are so astounding that the University of Denver is running a study to independently verify in a controlled environment."

The scholarships provided are a part of Elephant Learning’s social outreach program to help underserved children learn math. "Children in low income neighborhoods are 3 years behind their funded peers in math.  This directly contributes to the cycle of poverty." said Dr. Alvaro Arias, "that is why for each student we have in our system at full tuition, we provide a full-ride scholarship to an under served child."

To find out more information about applying for a scholarship or about the Elephant Learning Math Academy, visit https://www.elephantlearning.com/.

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